Could You Pass This Social Security Quiz?

Social Security is a different experience for every American, but a few aspects are the same. Last year, MassMutual put out a quiz about Social Security and they were surprised at how few people got even a passing grade. Let’s see how you do.

True or False:1

  1. In most cases, if I take benefits before my full retirement age, they will be reduced for early filing.
  2. If I am receiving benefits before my full retirement age and continue to work, my benefits might be reduced based on how much I make.
  3. If I have a spouse, they can receive benefits from my record even if he or she has no individual earnings history.
  4. If I have a spouse and he or she passes away, I will receive both my full benefit and my deceased spouse’s full benefit.
  5. The money that comes out of my paycheck for Social Security goes into a specific account for me and remains there, earning interest, until I begin to receive Social Security benefits.
  6. If I file for retirement benefits and have dependent children aged 18 or younger, they also may qualify for Social Security benefits.
  7. If I get divorced, I might be able to collect Social Security benefits based on my ex-spouse’s Social Security earnings history.
  8. Under current Social Security law, the full retirement age is 65 no matter when you were born.
  9. If I delay taking Social Security benefits past the age of 70, I will continue to get delayed retirement credit increases each year I wait.
  10. Social Security retirement benefits are subject to income tax just like withdrawals from a traditional individual retirement account.
  11. I must be a U.S. citizen to collect Social Security retirement benefits.

Ready for your answers? 1. True; 2. True; 3. True; 4. False; 5. False; 6. False; 7. True; 8. True; 9. True; 10. False; 11. False; 12. False; 13. False.

How did you do? According to MassMutual, 65% got the equivalent of a “D” or an “F.” So, while not everyone goes to the head of the class, most of us could do with a refresher on Social Security, what to think about before we take it, and to make our plans surrounding it.

Determining when to take Social Security benefits is a complicated financial decision. Here are a few things to think about and discuss with your financial professional.

If you have a family history that suggests you might live into your 90s, you may want to consider claiming Social Security later. If you start receiving Social Security benefits at or after full retirement age, your monthly benefit will be larger than if you had claimed at 62.

What fits best with your financial strategy—more lifetime payments that are smaller, or fewer lifetime payments that are larger?

Will you keep working? If you want to keep working, you’ll need to be mindful of earning too much income, which may result in your Social Security benefits being taxed.

Keep in mind that this article is for informational purposes only. It’s not a replacement for real-life advice, so be certain to consult your tax or accounting professional before modifying your decision on whether to work in retirement.

Prior to full retirement age, your benefits may be lessened if your income exceeds certain limits set by the IRS.

Social Security income may also be taxed above the program’s “combined income” threshold. Check with your tax professionals about how this might affect you.

When does your spouse want to file? Timing does matter, especially for two-income couples. A common strategy is for the lower-earning spouse to collect Social Security benefits first, and then the higher-earning spouse collects them later. This often results in a greater lifetime benefit for the household. However, you will want to check into your specific benefit amounts, as well as your tax and financial professionals. 

How much in benefits might be coming your way? Visit SSA.gov to find out, and keep in mind that Social Security calculates your monthly benefit using a formula based on your 35 highest-earning years. If you have worked for less than 35 years, Social Security fills in the “blank years” with zeros. If you have, say, just 33 years of work experience, working another couple of years might translate to a slightly higher Social Security income.

When to start drawing Social Security benefits may be one of the most significant financial decisions of your life. Ideally, your choices should be evaluated years in advance—with insight from the financial professional who has helped you prepare for retirement. And if you took the quiz and found room for improvement, all the more reason to consider working with a financial professional who may be able to help you up the learning curve.

Evergreen Financial Group is a Fee-Only Financial Planning and Investment Firm located in Billings, MT serving clients in Montana, Wyoming, Utah, and virtually across the country. Evergreen Financial Group specializes in working with Christian families, including Young Professionals, Current and Future Retirees and Church Staff Members. 


  1. https://www.yahoo.com/now/65-people-struggled-social-security-203124347.html

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